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WILDFLOWERS

TALL JACOB'S LADDER

Polemonium acutiflorum

Tall Jacob’s Ladder is a flower beautiful enough to unite Heaven and Earth.  Characterized by five pointed petals surrounding a cream center, the blooms vary from pale lavender to a darker, rich violet.  They appear in late May to early June on long slender stems 10”-36” tall and last through July.  A good seed producer that spreads well in most environments. *     

Tall Jacobs Ladder flower
Arctic Lupine flower

ARCTIC LUPIN

Lupinus arcticus

Arctic Lupine is a perennial noted for its palm shaped leaves and stunning large bloom covered stalks (24-30” tall) that produce purple and white blossoms from June to early July.  Lupines are poisonous, especially the seeds.  Do not eat any part of this plant.       

NOOTKA LUPINE

Lupinus nootkatensis

A perennial noted for its palm shaped leaves and stunning large bloom covered stalks (24-36” tall) that produce purple and white blossoms from June to early July.  Lupines are poisonous, especially the seeds.  Do not eat any part of this plant.      

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Fireweed

Epilobium angustifolium

A tall (2½ - 5 ft) bright pink flower that blooms in July and August.  A cultural touchstone for Alaskans, its iconic blooms are often the first new vegetation after a forest fire and the appearance of its seed pods signal the end of summer.  The flowers can be used for syrups and jellies and the leaves are priced for their vitamin A and C.  

LARKSPUR

Delphinium

Larkspur is a perennial unique for its 4’ to 6’ tall stems crowned with striking five petaled flowers that vary from indigo to dark purple.  Most at home in moist meadows and woodlands, Larkspur’s showy blooms appear in July and August adding color to the mid and late summer.  Larkspur are poisonous.  Do not eat any part of this plant. *      

Larkspur Delphinium flower
Western Columbine flower

WESTERN COLUMBINE

Aquilegia formosa

Western Columbine is a perennial that begins with deep green foliage, then shoots up branched curving stalks 18-24” tall that produce dramatic, crimson blooms with yellow centers.  The flowers appear in mid June through July, although Columbine is stunning all year as the leaves take on a reddish hue in the late summer. *   

Wild Iris

Iris Setosa

Wild Iris is a water loving perennial found throughout Alaska south of the Brooks Range.  Its broad bladelike leaves grow 12-24” tall and the striking blooms may be purple, blue or violet.  Iris spreads quickly and is vigorous once established but can be difficult to grow from seed, please see our website for germination instructions.  Wild Iris is poisonous, do not eat any part of this plant.    

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Yarrow

Achillea Borealis

WILD POTATO

Hedysarum alpinum

Eskimo Potato is a perennial often found on the edges of wooded areas.  Its long branches (24-36” tall) are covered with oval leaves and hanging pea shaped blossoms that range in color from light pink to fuschia.  Although the root of this plant is eaten by native Alaskans, plants from the Pea family may absorb selenium from the soil causing toxicity. We do not recommend consuming any part of this plant. *        

Eskimo Potato flower
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ALPINE ARNICA

Arnica alpina

Alpine Arnica is a perennial that can grow up to 12” tall producing large yellow daisy-like flowers in July and August.  Easy to grow and a prolific seed producer, it’s an excellent choice for color in the mid to late summer. *

ARCTIC WILD CHAMOMILE

Tripleurospermum maritima

Arctic Wild Chamomile is a tough little perennial aster that happily grows in sand, gravel, moss or among grasses. A great flower for beginners, the bright white blooms appear in June and July perched atop green, fine feathery foliage 12” to 18” tall. Beloved by birds, Wild Chamomile spreads easily and draws pollinators. *      

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White Oxytrope flower

WHITE OXYTROPE

Oxytropis campestris

White Oxytrope is small (6-8”) perennial with distinctive mint green oval leaves and white pea shaped flowers that appear in late May through June. Many Oxytropes contain a toxin, do not consume any part of this plant. *

* Disclaimer

Yearly variation in climatic conditions may cause flowers to be as much as 14 days ahead or behind their typical blooming season.  The size and appearance of plants may also be affected by growing conditions such as elevation, snowfall, winter temperatures, severe weather or wind, and depth of soil.

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